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Top Four Reasons to Visit The Columbus Museum When it Opens this Spring!

Updated: Feb 26

The Columbus Museum is currently under a major renovation that is scheduled to be completed this Spring.


The renovation will feature open sight lines, prioritize natural light, and showcase a complete reimagining of the way guests of all ages can interact with the Museum’s incredible collection.


Have we peaked your interest yet?


Here’s our list of the top four reasons to visit the Museum (and become a member!) when they reopen this Spring...



1) The Special Reopening Exhibitions & New Acquisitions


The Museum’s staff has worked tirelessly to secure an exciting list of exhibitions and loaned works that will be on view specifically for the reopening. Expect to see works by Andy Warhol, Amy Sherald, Elaine de Kooning, Alma Thomas, John Singer Sargent, and more!


In addition, the Museum’s collection has grown during the renovation to include many new impressive acquisitions. Among the new additions are works by Nick Cave, John Singleton Copley, Jacob Lawrence, and Charles Bird King. Many of these new acquisitions will be on display for guests to enjoy throughout the reopening celebrations.



2) The New Interactive Children’s Gallery & Garden


The reimagined Museum will feature a new and expansive Children’s Gallery with an adjoining Children’s Garden adjacent to the Museum’s main entrance. The relocated space will be convenient for families due to its prominent spot near the Museum's entrance. The space has been designed to serve as a playground for the senses – a place where children of all ages can be served through immersive experiences year round.


Littles ones will be able to climb to new heights in the space's new treehouse and accompanying slide. Expect to explore new interactive elements and experiences intended to foster a love for art and storytelling from an early age.


One new interactive element will allow guests to project themselves into masterpieces and explore art in a whole new dimension. Another will invite children to explore a new "mini museum" which offers children the chance to create and curate exhibitions!





3) The Newly-Restored Bradley Olmsted Garden & Garden Terrace


The Columbus Museum’s Bradley Olmsted Garden was designed for homeowner and noted industrialist W.C. Bradley in the 1920s by the Olmsted Brothers firm of Massachusetts. Frederick Law Olmsted, the famed American landscape architect, founded the firm and his naturalistic style is evident in this garden once known as Sunset Terrace. Of the thirteen residential projects the Olmsted firm worked on in Georgia, including others in Columbus, the Bradley garden is widely recognized as the most significant. 


As part of the Museum's reimagining, several essential features of the garden have been restored. These include the historic grotto, the natural spring ravine, and the original stone steps dating back to the 1920s. Enhancements have also been made to the garden terrace to seamlessly connect it to the galleries with a picturesque view of the garden.

For horticulture fans, it's important to know the Bradley Olmsted Garden features a diverse array of trees and blooms. This local gem showcases many indigenous species of the South, and is an ideal place for a quiet walk in any season.





4) All of the Exciting Events Surrounding the Reopening!

It's almost time to celebrate the reopening of this beautiful Columbus treasure. Save the date for the Museum's exciting lineup of events leading up to the official debut!



Have questions? Head to the Museum's website for all of the latest information. In the meantime, explore their new membership options (including reciprocal memberships to other museums!) by clicking here.


Columbus, Georgia is bursting with a thriving arts scene, and the Columbus Museum's reopening promises to continue fostering growth across all ares of the arts. Are you ready to explore this beautifully-reimagined space? We'll race you there!◾️


*Renderings and renovation details courtesy of The Columbus Museum.

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